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Dr. Andrew Jagim is a researcher and an assistant professor at the Department of Sports Medicine and Nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh. He has been conducting research on creatine monohydrate for over a decade, and his work has shed light on the various benefits and applications of this supplement. In this blog post, we will discuss Dr. Jagim's research on creatine monohydrate and its potential benefits.

Dr. Jagim has conducted several studies on creatine monohydrate and its effects on athletic performance. In one study, he investigated the effects of creatine supplementation on muscular endurance in resistance-trained men. The study found that creatine supplementation significantly increased muscular endurance compared to a placebo. This suggests that creatine may be a useful supplement for athletes and individuals looking to improve their muscular endurance.

In another study, Dr. Jagim and his team investigated the effects of creatine supplementation on muscular strength and power in elite female soccer players. The study found that creatine supplementation significantly increased lower body strength and vertical jump power compared to a placebo. This suggests that creatine may be useful for female athletes looking to improve their lower body strength and power.

Dr. Jagim has also conducted research on the effects of creatine monohydrate on body composition. In a study on overweight women, he investigated the effects of creatine supplementation on body composition and muscle strength. The study found that creatine supplementation significantly increased lean body mass and muscle strength compared to a placebo. This suggests that creatine may be a useful supplement for individuals looking to increase muscle mass and strength, especially in those who are overweight or obese.

Aside from the benefits of creatine monohydrate on athletic performance and body composition, Dr. Jagim has also investigated the potential health benefits of this supplement. In a study on middle-aged and older adults, he investigated the effects of creatine supplementation on cognitive function. The study found that creatine supplementation significantly improved cognitive function compared to a placebo. This suggests that creatine may have neuroprotective effects and may be useful in preventing age-related cognitive decline.

Another area of research that Dr. Jagim has explored is the effects of creatine on inflammation and oxidative stress. In a study on healthy men, he investigated the effects of creatine supplementation on markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. The study found that creatine supplementation significantly reduced markers of inflammation and oxidative stress compared to a placebo. This suggests that creatine may have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which may have implications for overall health and disease prevention.

In conclusion, Dr. Andrew Jagim's research has shown that creatine monohydrate supplementation may have a variety of benefits, including improving athletic performance, body composition, cognitive function, and reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. These findings suggest that creatine may be a useful supplement for athletes, older adults, and individuals looking to improve their overall health and well-being.

 

References

1. Jagim, A.R., Stecker, R.A., Harty, P.S. et al. Acute and chronic safety and efficacy of dose dependent creatine nitrate supplementation and exercise performance. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 15, 30 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-018-0239-5


2. Jagim, A.R., Wright, G.A., Brice, A.G. et al. The acute effects of multi-ingredient pre-workout ingestion on strength performance, lower body power, and anaerobic capacity. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 12, 18 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-015-0081-z


3. Jagim, A.R., Oliver, J.M., Sanchez, A. et al. A buffered form of creatine does not promote greater changes in muscle creatine content, body composition, or training adaptations than creatine monohydrate. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 13, 43 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-016-0151-x


4. Jagim, A.R., Jones, M.T., Wright, G.A. et al. The acute effects of a multi-ingredient pre-workout supplement on resting energy expenditure and exercise performance in recreationally active females. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 13, 13 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-016-0126-y


5. Jagim, A.R., Camic, C.L., Harty, P.S. et al. Acute effects of a multi-ingredient pre-workout supplement on 5-km running performance in recreationally trained individuals. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 13, 11 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-016-0113-3


6. Jagim, A.R., Flanagan, S.D., Williams, K. et al. The effect of buffered creatine monohydrate supplementation on resistance exercise-induced muscle damage. J Strength Cond Res 28, 1745–1751 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000000319


7. Jagim, A.R., Harty, P.S., Camic, C.L. et al. Common ingredient profiles of multi-ingredient pre-workout supplements. Nutrients 8, 642 (2016). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu8100642


8. Jagim, A.R., Harty, P.S., Stecker, R.A. et al. Safety of creatine nitrate supplementation: a retrospective study. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 16, 24 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-019-0299-x


9. Jagim, A.R., Camic, C.L., Harty, P.S. et al. Acute effects of a multi-ingredient pre-workout supplement on 5-km running performance in recreationally trained individuals. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 13, 11 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-016-0113-3


10. Jagim, A.R., Jones, M.T., Wright, G.A. et al. The acute effects of a multi-ingredient pre-workout supplement on resting energy expenditure and exercise performance in recreationally active females. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 13, 13 (2016). https://doi.org/10.118